Join me at History Detectives@Work and help solve local history mysteries right around Victoria

Our History Detectives@Work program has been created for the youngest historians in our community. 

Using a local history magnifying glass we facilitate a history study that fulfils Victorian Curriculum requirements for Levels 1-6 but is immersed in the school’s own community and locality. This makes every program unique and relevant to the students involved. 

Our two-hour incursion begins with history detective training. Afterwards your students will join History Detectives@Work and put their training into practice to uncover a local history mystery. 

Our History Detective-in-Residence program is available to extend your incursion. We can tie a local history program to your school’s anniversary or a special event in your locality, or it might spring from a connection with a particular building or place, a person or group of people, or a broader ethos or historical narrative. The possibilities are endless.

This is community history at its best. Your students develop a strong sense of belonging to and empathy with the community they are part of. But equally, they will come to understand important historical concepts and the value of empathy over sympathy, and of understanding over accepting face values.

For schools that are an integral and important part of their local community, a local history project enables you to reach out, connect with and embrace this relationship.

You can follow the progress of local history mystery discoveries in schools across Victoria by following @detectiveatwork on twitter or reading the History Detectives@Work tag on our blog page.

This was the membership card for our first History Detectives program, which resulted in a plethora of historical investigations and work, much of which was published in our 125th anniversary publication Fairfield Primary School 2711. 'The Langridge Street Knowledge Emporium' in 2010

This was the membership card for our first History Detectives program, which resulted in a plethora of historical investigations and work, much of which was published in our 125th anniversary publication Fairfield Primary School 2711. 'The Langridge Street Knowledge Emporium' in 2010

Illustration by Scarlet Sykes-Hesterman

Illustration by Scarlet Sykes-Hesterman